About office paper and its use

What is paper weight?

In general, a measure of paper density is the number of grams per square meter of sheet surface – g/sq. m.

This formulation is confusing because it does not mean density, but the ratio of mass to the area of ​​a paper sheet. It turns out that it is more correct to say: surface area of ​​the leaf.

But this name is long and is not popular when describing paper parameters. The second inaccuracy lies in the formulation of density. Often it refers to bulk density, which is measured in grams per cubic meter –  g/cubic. m. офисная бумага снегурочка в упаковке с обозначением плотности бумаги

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSxJkKiHXbw

For example, speaking about the density of Svetocopy or Snegurochka paper in A4 format for a laser printer, which is 80 g/sq. m. we are talking about specific gravity, not thickness. Paper thickness is measured in microns or millimeters.

Such confusion in concepts came to us from America, where the weight of 500 sheets of paper of a specific format is taken as density. In Europe and a number of CIS countries, the ISO international classification standard is used.

It turns out that when talking about paper density, we are talking about the weight of a sheet with an area of ​​1 square meter. As a result, the higher the paper density, the thicker the paper sheet.

Office paper whiteness

Whiteness is a characteristic of paper that shows how close the color of a sheet of paper is to white. This characteristic greatly affects the consumer properties of paper. Buyer

wants to have paper as white as possible, even when he does not need color printing at all, where it is really important to have paper of increased whiteness. Image considerations and
come into play here

prestige.

Due to the fact that there is no objective definition of white from a physical point of view, several different scales for measuring paper whiteness are used around the world. The most common two measurement systems.

The first system is a system of measuring whiteness as a percentage, where 100% means the ideal white color, which in practice is never achieved. The second system is called the CIE system.

As you know, paper is made from cellulose, which in turn is made from wood. Therefore, the natural color of the paper should be the color of the wood when freshly cut. To make the paper white when making it

complex technologies of chemical bleaching (often chlorine) and physical bleaching by adding ordinary chalk are used.

All paper manufacturers have their own bleaching secrets. At the whitest papers

The degree of whiteness can reach 98%. A difference in paper whiteness of 1%-2% is almost invisible to the eye. The color of the paper changes much more strongly and noticeably depending on the lighting: sunny, cloudy, lamp

incandescent or fluorescent lamp.

Wet strength

Wet strength, or wet strength, is another important parameter for most papers and is especially critical for paper produced on fast paper machines to ensure smooth operation of the machine as the paper web moves from one section to another. cars to another.

The moisture resistance of paper can be increased in two ways: either hydrophobic substances are added to the composition of the paper pulp during manufacturing (this operation is called sizing in the pulp), or sizing agents are applied to the surface of the finished paper (surface sizing).

Humidity

The ratio of pulp to water is the most important factor in paper chemistry. The amount of water contained in individual fibers affects their strength, elasticity and paper-forming properties. The moisture content of paper affects its weight, strength, permanence, dimensional stability and electrical properties.

Smoothness

Smoothness characterizes the condition of the paper’s surface due to mechanical finishing and determines the paper’s appearance—rough paper is generally unattractive to the eye. Smoothness is important for writing papers, for printing papers, and also when gluing paper.

In addition, the smoothness of the paper, that is, the microrelief, the microgeometry of its surface determines the “resolution” of the paper – its ability to transmit the finest colorful lines, dots and their combinations without breaks or distortions. This is one of the most important printing properties of paper.

The smoother the paper, the better the contact between its surface and the printing plate, the less pressure you need to apply when printing, and the higher the image quality. The smoothness of paper is determined in seconds using pneumatic instruments or through profilograms, which give a visual representation of the nature of the paper surface.

Different printing methods place different smoothness requirements on paper. Thus, calendered printing paper should have a smoothness of 100 to 250 s, while offset paper of the same degree of finishing can have a smoothness much lower – 80-150 s. Gravure printing papers have an increased smoothness of 300 to 700 seconds.

Newsprint cannot be smooth due to its high porosity. The application of any coating layer significantly improves the smoothness of the surface – be it surface gluing, pigmentation, light or simple coating, which, in turn, can be different: one-sided and double-sided, single and multiple, etc.

Surface sizing is the application of a thin layer of sizing agents to the surface of the paper (coating weight is up to 6 g/m2) in order to ensure high strength of the paper surface, protecting it from plucking out individual fibers with sticky inks, as well as the purpose of reducing paper deformation when moistened to ensure accurate color matching during multicolor printing. This is especially important for offset and lithographic printing, when the paper is moistened with water during the printing process.

Pigmentation and paper coating differ only in the mass of the applied coating. It is believed that the weight of the coating layer in pigmented papers does not exceed 14 g/m2, and in coated papers reaches 40 g/m2. The chalk layer is characterized by a high degree of whiteness and smoothness.

For coated papers, high smoothness is one of the most important characteristics, which reaches 1000 s or more, while the relief height does not exceed 1 micron. The smoothness indicator not only ensures optimal interaction between paper and paint, but also improves the optical properties of the surface that perceives the colorful image. The high smoothness of coated paper allows printing with good imprinting at small thicknesses of the ink layer.

The opposite of smoothness is roughness, which is measured in microns (µm). It directly characterizes the microrelief of the paper surface. The technical specifications of paper must contain one of these two values.

Protect with low tensile strength paper

As a rule, tensile strength is valued in papers. The higher it is, the better – a product made from durable paper is more durable. However, there are times when paper with low tensile strength may be indispensable, for example in cases where it is necessary to provide good protection, since such label paper will collapse if any attempt is made to peel it off.

Such paper exists – Tamperproof security label paper from Raflatac. Tamperproof is a cellulose matte paper with very low tensile strength used in security labels because it tears when peeled off.

Ash content

The ash content of paper depends mainly on the quantitative content of fillers in its composition. High strength paper should have a low ash content because minerals reduce the strength of the paper. A high ash content is undesirable in such types of papers as photographic, electrical insulating, and filter papers.

The editors express gratitude for the assistance in compiling the material from the Bereg company and the Regent Group of Companies

ComputerArt 10’2005

How to determine paper density by thickness

The paper thickness is usually written on the packaging and there is no reason not to trust the manufacturer. True, an error is allowed in the production of paper, but no more than 5 – 10%, which affects the final density of the product.

If you received a sheet of paper without packaging, and you want to know its density, then you can take a caliper or thickness gauge (aka micrometer) and measure the thickness of the paper manually.

Knowing the thickness of standard paper, you can determine its density. Below are paper weights and thicknesses.

Tracing paper

Tracing paper is thin paper with a density of 1.2 – 1.25 kg per m3. It is used in construction and cooking. Architects use tracing paper to make manual blueprints of projects, and also superimpose several project drawings on top of each other to see the differences when combined.

Classification of office paper

Regular office paper of A4/A3 format with a density of 80 g/m2 is divided into 3 classes:

  • Class C.
    Whiteness about 145 CIE.
    It can be used without problems in black-and-white copiers and printers with print/copy speeds of up to 35 pages per minute in single-sided print/copy mode. This office paper is not suitable for colored people

    copiers and printers. Not recommended for inkjet printers.

  • Class B.
    Whiteness about 160 CIE.
    It can be used without problems in black-and-white copiers and printers with print/copy speeds of up to 180 pages per minute in duplex printing/copying mode. This office paper provides acceptable quality

    mono printing on an inkjet printer.

  • Class A.
    Whiteness from 165 CIE.
    It can be used without problems in black-and-white and color copiers and laser and inkjet printers at any print speed, except for printing/copying photographs.

The classification system for office papers in Russia and Europe is slightly different. Our class B corresponds to European C, and our B corresponds to European B. Thus, DataCopy paper in Russia is positioned as class A office paper, but in Europe it belongs to class B.

Recently, the line between Class C and Class B has become blurred. Ultimately, this will result in only two classes of office paper remaining: everyday office paper and

premium office paper.

This is much more understandable for the office paper consumer.

Linear deformation during humidification

The increase in the dimensions of a moistened sheet of paper in its width and length, expressed as a percentage relative to the original dimensions of the dry sheet, is called linear deformation upon moistening. The values ​​of paper deformation when wet and residual deformation are important indicators for many types of paper (for offset, chart, cartographic, for photo substrate, for paper with watermarks).

High values ​​of these indicators lead to misalignment of ink contours during printing and, as a consequence, to poor-quality printing. However, it should be noted that GOST contains very stringent test conditions (wetting a calibrated strip of paper for a certain time), the use of which is impractical for most printed types of paper.

Papers intended for flat-sheet printing must have minimal deformation when moistened, since, according to the conditions of the printing process technology, they come into contact with moistened surfaces. Paper is a hygroscopic material: as humidity increases, its fibers swell and expand, mainly in diameter.

The paper loses its shape, warps and wrinkles, and when dried, the reverse process occurs: the paper shrinks, resulting in a change in format. High humidity sharply reduces the mechanical tensile strength of paper; the paper cannot withstand high printing speeds and breaks. Changes in paper humidity during multicolor printing lead to ink misregistration and color rendition problems.

Gloss or gloss

Gloss (gloss) is a property of paper that expresses the degree of polish, gloss, or the ability of a surface to reflect light falling on it. This indicator can be considered as the property of the paper surface to reflect light at a given angle. Thus, gloss (gloss) can be characterized as the ratio of the amount of light reflected in the specular direction to the amount of incident light.

Typically, as smoothness increases, gloss also increases, but this relationship is ambiguous. It should be remembered that smoothness is determined mechanically, while gloss is an optical characteristic. The gloss of glazed paper can be 7580%, and matte paper can be up to 30%.

Most consumers of printed materials prefer glossy papers, but gloss is not always needed in publications. Thus, when reproducing text or line illustrations, paper with minimal gloss is used, for example, machine-smooth paper. And various brochures, labels, and reproductions of paintings look great on high-gloss paper.

Mass or weight

The weight (or weight) of one square meter of paper is the most common indicator, since most papers are sold by weight of 1 m2. The mass of paper is often referred to as a unit of area rather than as a unit of volume (as is done with other materials), because paper is used in the form of a sheet and area in this case plays a more important role than volume.

Mechanical strength

Mechanical strength is one of the basic and most important properties of most types of paper and cardboard. Standards for printed types of paper provide for certain requirements for mechanical tensile strength. These requirements are determined by the possibility of producing printed types of paper without breaks on modern high-speed machines, followed by passing it through high-speed rewinders and then using it on printing machines.

In the paper industry, the tensile strength of paper is usually characterized by breaking load or breaking length of paper. Ordinary paper made on a paper machine is characterized by different strength indicators in the machine and transverse directions of the sheet. It is larger in the machine direction because that is the orientation of the fibers in the finished paper.

The tensile strength of paper does not depend on the strength of individual components, but on the strength of the paper structure itself, which is formed during the papermaking process. This property is usually characterized by breaking length in meters or breaking force in newtons.

Softness

The softness of paper is related to its structure, that is, its density and porosity. Thus, large-pored newsprint can be deformed under compression up to 28%, and for thick coated paper the compressive deformation does not exceed 68%. For letterpress printing, it is important that these deformations are completely reversible, that is, that after removing the load, the paper completely restores its original shape.

Otherwise, traces of reverse relief are visible on the print, indicating that serious changes have occurred in the structure of the paper. If the paper is intended for embossing, then the goal, on the contrary, is residual deformation, and the indicator of quality is its irreversibility, otherwise the stability of the embossing relief.

Purpose of paper depending on density

Below is a ranking by density of paper, which is often used in printing for the manufacture of products for various purposes:

So that you don’t get bored while reading about the thickness of paper, watch a cute and kind cartoon about the role of a paper airplane in a person’s life – a cartoon about love with good sound design in the best style of a French animatographer from the Disney company.

About office paper and its use

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Plain office paper A4/A3 80 g/m 2
divided into 3 classes:

  • Class C.
    Whiteness about 145 CIE.
    It can be used without problems in black-and-white copiers and printers with print/copy speeds of up to 35 pages per minute in single-sided print/copy mode. This office paper is not suitable for color copiers and printers. Not recommended for inkjet printers.
  • Class B.
    Whiteness about 160 CIE.
    It can be used without problems in black-and-white copiers and printers with print/copy speeds of up to 180 pages per minute in duplex printing/copying mode. This office paper provides acceptable mono printing quality on an inkjet printer.
  • Class A.
    Whiteness from 165 CIE.
    It can be used without problems in black-and-white and color copiers and laser and inkjet printers at any print speed, except for printing/copying photographs.

The classification system for office papers in Russia and Europe is slightly different.
Our class B corresponds to European C, and our B corresponds to European B. Thus, DataCopy paper in Russia is positioned as class A office paper, but in Europe it belongs to class B.

Lately, the line between Class C and Class B has become blurred. Ultimately, this will result in only two classes of office paper remaining: everyday office paper and premium office paper.

This is much more understandable for the office paper consumer.

Format
office paper is the size of its sheet. The format is usually measured in millimeters (mm), less often in centimeters (cm). The most common A4 office paper size is 210 x 297 mm. The A3 office paper format is twice as large in area, and the size of one of the sides is the same as in A4, and the other is 2 times larger: 420 x 297 mm. A3 paper is not suitable for all office equipment. When purchasing a copy machine and/or printer, you need to look at the Specifications section in the Instructions to find out whether this office equipment can work with A3 paper. A3 paper is used much less frequently in office work than A4 paper.

Sometimes you can still find writing paper in the Soviet C11 format: 203 x288 mm. It is slightly smaller than A4 format.

Finally, for office devices there is A3 paper. This size is slightly larger than A3, namely: 329 x 483 mm.

Other paper sizes are not considered office paper. Although these formats may be present in office equipment. For example, many printers and copiers are designed to work on formats smaller than A4. In particular, many office inkjet printers are capable of working on 100 x 150 mm photo formats and even printing on CDs.

  • Portrait (portrait)
    The orientation of office paper is that the larger side of the paper is vertical and the smaller side is horizontal.
  • Landscape (landscape)
    The orientation of office paper is, on the contrary, when the larger side is horizontal and the smaller side is vertical.

Paper weight
is the weight of a sheet of paper per unit area. Typically, paper density is measured in grams per square meter. If you are told that the paper has a weight of 120 g/m 2
, this means that a sheet of this paper with an area of ​​1 square meter will weigh 120 grams. Very often, buyers confuse paper density and thickness. In their delusion, they try to determine its density by feeling. This is why many buyers want to feel the paper when purchasing paper.

The standard density of office paper is 80 grams per square meter. Any office equipment should work with office paper of this thickness. Why did the standard paper density become exactly this density of 80 g/m 2
, and not another? This standard was set by Xerox after Xerox invented the copier.

Dot matrix printers and typewriters can work with office paper of lower density, approximately 60-65 g/m 2
. This type of paper is often called writing paper. Its low density is due to the ability to work with carbon paper and print up to five copies at once. Laser and inkjet printers, as well as copiers, do not guarantee work with office paper of such low density.

Printers and copiers can handle office paper heavier than 80 gsm 2
. Before buying office paper of a higher density, you need to look at the instructions for your printer and/or copier and see what maximum density of office paper your office equipment can work with.

Main densities of office papers – 65, 80, 100, 120, 160, 200, 220, 250 and 280 g/m 2
.

Thickness
office paper is usually measured in microns (µm), that is, thousandths of a millimeter. The thickness of the paper, generally speaking, is not strictly tied to the density of the paper. Therefore, customers often believe that different standard 80gsm office papers may feel different to the touch. In fact, it is not the density of office paper that is determined by touch, but its thickness. Therefore, all the talk about some office paper manufacturers not being able to withstand the density of 80 g/m 2
can only be done if the stack of paper is weighed on a scale. It is easy to calculate that a sheet of A4 office paper with a density of exactly 80 g/m 2
should weigh 4.9896 g, and the entire pack (without packaging) of 500 sheets should weigh approximately 2 kg 495 g. If, when weighed, a smaller number is obtained, then, indeed, the declared standard density is not maintained.

Thickness of different brands of office paper of the same density 80 g/m 2
You can compare by placing two stacks of five packs of two different brands of paper on the table. This will be exactly 2500 sheets in each stack. And a significant difference in the height of the stacks will indicate a significant difference in thickness.

At the same density, the thicker the paper, the more loose and porous it is. This is not always good for inkjet printers if the ink is not pigment based, but water based. The thinner the paper at the same density, the more compressed it is.

If we consider not different brands of office paper, but the same brand, then the higher the density of the paper, the greater its thickness. There is usually a direct relationship between the density of the paper and its thickness.

Manufacturers of office paper do not believe that paper thickness affects the paper’s passage through office equipment and therefore generally do not list the thickness of their paper in the specifications list. It is believed that the paper density affects the passage of office paper through a copier or printer. The thickness of office paper of the same brand may vary slightly from one batch to another. Which may also be the reason for various rumors about defects or piracy in the production of office paper.

Another myth that exists among buyers of office paper. Sheet thickness is often confused with sheet elasticity. The thickness of a sheet of paper is a strict objective value that can be measured with instruments. But there is no objective concept of paper elasticity. Let’s start with the fact that paper, unlike most metals and other materials, has strong plastic properties. Pinch any paper at the fold and straighten it again. There was a trace of bending on the sheet and the sheet did not take its original shape. The larger the fold, the less elastic the paper becomes. Further, the elasticity of the paper depends on the size across the fold. Purely subjectively, a business card seems more elastic than a sheet of A3 paper. Some sellers use this and, as a sample of paper, give the buyer to touch a piece of paper the size of a business card or even smaller, so that subjectively the buyer seems this paper stiffer, and therefore thicker.

Whiteness
– this characteristic of paper, which shows how close the color of a sheet of paper is to white. This characteristic greatly affects the consumer properties of paper. The buyer wants to have paper as white as possible, even when he does not need color printing at all, where it is really important to have paper of increased whiteness. Considerations of image and prestige come into play here.

Due to the fact that there is no objective definition of white from a physical point of view, several different scales for measuring paper whiteness are used around the world. The most common two measurement systems. The first system is a system of measuring whiteness as a percentage, where 100% means the ideal white color, which in practice is never achieved. The second system is called the CIE system.

As you know, paper is made from cellulose, which in turn is made from wood. Therefore, the natural color of the paper should be the color of the wood when freshly cut. To make paper white, it is made using complex technologies of chemical bleaching (often with chlorine) and physical bleaching by adding ordinary chalk. All paper manufacturers have their own bleaching secrets. The whitest papers can reach 98% whiteness. A difference in paper whiteness of 1%-2% is almost invisible to the eye. The color of the paper changes much more strongly and noticeably depending on the lighting: sunny, cloudy, incandescent or fluorescent.

For small-run production of business cards in offices and apartments, high-density office paper is used. Typically this is paper with a density of 200 g/m to 300 g/m. Either office paper is used for laser printers and copiers if business cards are printed on a black and white or color laser printer or on an inkjet printer without full color. For inkjet full color, inkjet photo paper or microporous photo paper is used.

Other A3/A4 format materials are also used on office printers and copiers.

These are, first of all, transparent films for projection devices for presentations, tracing paper for pressing the original layout for offset printing, thermal transfer paper for transferring images to fabric and designer art paper for simulating painting.

Paper in rolls with a width of 210 mm to 420 mm is used mainly on dot matrix printers. Moreover, such paper comes with both side perforation (holes on the sides) and without perforation. The paper itself in such rolls (rollers) usually resembles writing paper with a density of 60-70 g/m2.

Rolled paper of long length, which needs to be torn into identical sheets after printing, is often not rolled into a roller, but accordion-folded onto sheets of A4 or A3 format. To make it easier to tear the paper tape into separate sheets, small perforations are made along the folds of such paper.

Some inkjet printers have the ability to work with roll photo paper.

Older fax machines use fax paper rolls, which are thermal paper. This thermal paper turns black where it is heated. Special thermal heads are heated in the right places under the influence of electric current and the image is applied to the fax paper.

A similar printing mechanism works in new cash registers and prints on receipt paper (cash tape). The receipt paper of modern cash registers is also thermal paper.

Plotters use both wide-format roll paper and large-format sheet paper: A0, A1 and A2.

Many people find it tempting to use printing papers for offset printing in office equipment, for example, glossy, coated, embossed and designer. But this is not always possible. Firstly, offset paper must be cut into a format suitable for office equipment. Secondly, offset paper is primarily non-absorbent paper. It is designed for offset ink, which is not absorbed into the paper, but dries quickly on its surface.

Source: altero.perm.ru
September 2009

General paper weight specifications

The most common weights for printing papers:

  • from 35 g/m2 to 70 g/m 2

    – fairly thin paper that is used for printing checks, newspapers, leaflets, etc.;
  • 80g/m 2

    – This is the density of standard office paper. Also used for printing on plotters and engineering machines;
  • 90-115g/m 2

    – most often booklets, certificates and leaflets are printed on coated paper of this density. You can also find office paper 90 g/m 2
    ;
  • 130g/m 2

    150g/m 2

    – used to create high-quality advertising materials and photo printing;
  • 170g/m 2

    – a good solution for making calendars, decoration, color laser printing;
  • 200g/m 2


    – high-density paper on which solid invitations, booklets and blocks of books are printed;
  • 250g/m 2


    – designer paper has such a density; postcards and inexpensive business cards are also printed on it;
  • 300g/m 2


    – most business cards are printed on this kind of paper.

Paper weight for receipt tape

Our standard receipt tape has a density of 44 g/m2 – this is the thinnest, most popular and inexpensive option. And for tapes of terminals and ATMs they prefer a more rigid base – 55 g/m2. This technique has large rollers, and in order for the checks not to slip, they must have a significant density.

Newsprint Weight

This paper should not be too thick so that the paint is absorbed well into it. It can be rolled – more convenient and economical – and sheet format A3, A4. In our production we use materials with a density of 45 and 48.8 g/m2.

Our company is a manufacturer of a wide variety of types of paper – from receipt to chart paper – of different densities. We choose only reliable suppliers, offer competitive prices, and do not skimp on quality!

Porosity

Porosity directly affects the absorbency of paper, that is, its ability to accept printing ink, and may well serve as a characteristic of the structure of the paper. Paper is a porous capillary material; In this case, a distinction is made between macro and micro porosity.

Macropores, or simply pores, are spaces between fibers filled with air and moisture. Micropores, or capillaries, are tiny spaces of indeterminate shape that penetrate the top layer of coated papers, as well as spaces formed between filler particles or between them and the walls of cellulose fibers in uncoated papers.

There are also capillaries inside cellulose fibers. All uncoated, lightly compacted papers, such as newsprint, are macroporous. The total pore volume in such papers reaches 60% or more, and the average pore radius is about 0.160.18 microns. Such papers absorb paint well due to their loose structure, that is, a highly developed inner surface.

If we depict the structure of paper in the form of a scale, then at one of its ends there will be macroporous papers consisting entirely of wood pulp, for example, newspaper. The other end of the scale will accordingly be occupied by pure cellulose microporous papers, for example coated ones.

Thus, coated papers belong to microporous, or capillary, papers. They also absorb paint well, but under the influence of capillary pressure forces. Here the porosity is only 30%, and the pore size does not exceed 0.03 microns. The remaining papers occupy an intermediate position.

In fact, this means that when printing on offset paper, both the solvents contained in the paint and the coloring pigments penetrate into the pores, as a result of which the concentration of pigment on the surface is low and it is impossible to achieve rich colors. When printing on coated paper, the diameter of the pores of the coated layer is so small that only solvents are absorbed into them, while the pigment particles remain on the surface of the paper, resulting in a very saturated image.

Macroporous papers accept paint well, absorbing it as a whole. The paints here are low viscosity. Liquid paint quickly fills large pores, absorbing to a fairly large depth, and excessive absorption can even cause the print to “punch through,” that is, the image will become visible from the back of the sheet.

Microporous (capillary) papers are characterized by the mechanism of so-called selective absorption, when, under the action of capillary pressure forces, mainly the low-viscosity ink component (solvent) is absorbed into the micropores of the surface layer of the paper, and the pigment and film former remain on the surface of the paper.

Clearance

The lumen of paper characterizes the degree of uniformity of its structure, that is, the degree of uniform distribution of fibers in it. The lumen of the paper is judged by observation in transmitted light. Heavily cloudy paper is extremely heterogeneous. Its thin places are also the least durable and easily allow water, ink, and printing ink to pass through. Due to the unevenness of the paper’s perception of printing ink, printing on cloud paper is of poor quality.

Paper that is uneven in clearance, and therefore in thickness, is characterized by an increased tendency to warp the surface. Applying coatings to the surface of such paper (coating, varnishing, waxing) is associated with production difficulties and entails the appearance of defects.

Savings with puffy paper

High bulk paper has a lower volumetric weight per square meter. Puffy papers feel thicker to the touch than traditional papers of the same weight. A product printed on such paper will look similar to the usual one, but will weigh less. The effect is manifested in weight savings: for example, when replacing offset 90 g/m 2
on bulk paper 70 g/m 2
savings will be 22%.

Plump paper is also recommended for creating a more attractive look for a publication such as a book. By using paper with high bulk, the book will look more voluminous and solid.

One of the well-known high-bulk coated papers in our market is Garda Pat 13, produced at the Italian Garda factory. This paper is tinted in the mass and has an ivory color, which gives the publications printed on it a special charm, emphasized by the noble matte finish of the surface. And the high level of opacity and plumpness (1.30-1.35) adds solidity and presentability to the publication. Another equally well-known plump paper is pure cellulose “Power” with double-sided two-layer coating from the largest South Korean paper manufacturer Shinho Paper. Arctic Volumeс plump paper with a completely matte finish with a density of 90 to 300 g/m 2 is also widely known.
. And, of course, Galerie One paper, specially designed for printing advertising and marketing materials, as well as highly artistic publications, which, due to its high bulk and rigidity, feels the same to the touch as paper of higher density.

Paper with a cloudy gap is difficult to color and clouds of different colors are formed. Thick areas of the paper web are colored more intensely and thin areas less intensely.

Plump

An important geometric property of paper, along with thickness and weight, 1 m2, is plumpness. It characterizes the degree of compaction of the paper and is very closely related to such an optical characteristic as opacity: that is, the plumper the paper, the more opaque it is at the same grammage.

Plumpness is measured in cubic centimeters per gram (cm3/g). The bulk of printed papers ranges on average from 2 cm3/g (for loose, porous) to 0.73 cm3/g (for high-density calendered papers). In practice, this means that if you take thicker paper of a smaller grammage, then for the same opacity there will be more sheets in a ton of paper.

Light resistance, or opacity

Opacity is the ability of paper to transmit light rays. The opacity of paper is determined by the total amount of light transmitted (scattered and unscattered). Opacity is usually determined by the degree of penetration of the image into the test material placed directly opposite the object in question.

A more commonly used term is “paper opacity”—the ratio of the amount of light reflected from a sheet of paper resting on a black backing to the light reflected from an opaque ream of that paper.

Fracture resistance

The fracture resistance index is also one of the significant indicators characterizing the mechanical strength of paper. It depends on the length of the fibers from which the paper is formed, on their strength, flexibility and on the bonding forces between the fibers. Therefore, paper consisting of long, strong, flexible and tightly interconnected fibers has the highest fracture resistance.

Protect with low tensile strength paper

As a rule, tensile strength is valued in papers. The higher it is, the better – a product made from durable paper is more durable. However, there are times when paper with low tensile strength may be indispensable, for example in cases where it is necessary to provide good protection, since such label paper will collapse if any attempt is made to peel it off. Such paper exists – Tamperproof security label paper from Raflatac. Tamperproof is a cellulose matte paper with very low tensile strength used in security labels because it tears when peeled off.

Burst resistance

Such a quality indicator as punching resistance can hardly be considered one of the main ones. According to current standards, it is provided for a very limited number of types of paper, but this indicator is of great importance for packaging and wrapping papers. This indicator is to some extent related to the breaking load of paper and its elongation at break.

For some types of paper and cardboard, the surface abrasion resistance indicator is one of the criteria that determines the consumer properties of the material. This applies to drawing and cartographic papers that allow what is written, drawn or printed to be removed by erasing with an eraser, razor blade or knife without unduly damaging the surface.

Thickness and density of office paper:

  • 80 gr./sq. m.
    – 0.1 mm (104 microns)

It is worth remembering that the density of paper can be different with the same thickness.

Assuming the same density, thicker paper will be looser, which can have a negative effect when printing on inkjet printers with water-based inks.

Thin paper will be more compressed. A striking example of such paper is offset paper, on which the ink is not absorbed, but dries quickly on the surface.

Office paper formats (sizes)

Office paper size is the size of its sheet. The format is usually measured in millimeters (mm), less often in centimeters (cm). The most common A4 office paper size is:

210mm*297mm. The A3 office paper format is twice as large in area, and in size one of the sides is the same as A4, and the other is 2 times larger: 420mm * 297mm.

A3 paper is not suitable for everyone

office equipment. When purchasing a copy machine and/or printer, you need to look at the Specifications section in the Instructions to find out whether this office equipment can work with A3 paper. Paper size

A3 is used in office work much less frequently than A4 paper.

Sometimes you can still find writing paper in the Soviet C11 format: 203*288mm. It is slightly smaller than A4 format.

Finally, for office devices there is A3 paper. This size is slightly larger than A3, namely: 329mm*483mm.

Other paper sizes are not considered office paper. Although these formats may be present in office equipment. For example, many printers and copiers are designed to work on formats smaller than A4.

In particular, many office inkjet printers are capable of working on 10cm*15cm photo formats and even printing on CDs.

Save money with chubby paper

High bulk paper has a lower volumetric weight per square meter. Puffy papers feel thicker to the touch than traditional papers of the same weight. A product printed on such paper will look similar to the usual one, but will weigh less.

Plump paper is also recommended for creating a more attractive look for a publication such as a book. By using paper with high bulk, the book will look more voluminous and solid.

One of the well-known high-bulk coated papers on our market is Garda Pat 13, produced at the Italian Garda factory. This paper is tinted in the mass and has an ivory color, which gives the publications printed on it a special charm, emphasized by the noble matte finish of the surface.

And the high level of opacity and plumpness (1.30-1.35) adds solidity and presentability to the publication. Another equally well-known plump paper is pure cellulose “Power” with double-sided two-layer coating from the largest South Korean paper manufacturer Shinho Paper.

Also widely known is the plump Arctic Volume paper with a completely matte finish with a density of 90 to 300 g/m2. And, of course, Galerie One paper, specially designed for printing advertising and marketing materials, as well as highly artistic publications, which, due to its high bulk and rigidity, feels the same to the touch as paper of higher density.

Electronic paper

The Japanese company Fujitsu Laboratories has gone the furthest in the production of the thinnest paper, which launched the production of electronic paper in 2006. Pursuing the lofty goal of finally making offices paperless, the Japanese have created ultra-thin paper, which in appearance and mechanical properties is no different from ordinary printer paper (it can be folded, unfolded, and crumpled).